Smithsonian X 3D
November 13-14, 2013

About the Speakers

Sarah Allen
Sarah Allen

Presidential Innovation Fellow, Smithsonian Institution
Sarah Allen, as a Presidential Innovation Fellow at the Smithsonian Institution, works on making fully digitized collections more accessible through crowdsourced transcription. Most recently, Sarah led mobile strategy, design & development company, Blazing Cloud, as well as her own startup, Mightyverse, which aims to help people communicate across languages and cultures. Sarah is an expert in all things mobile, with a particular passion for effective animation and practical use of the mobile web. Sarah also actively works to diversify the tech community with RailsBridge, which she co-founded in 2009. She was named one of the top 25 women of the web by SF WoW (San Francisco Women of the Web) in 1998. With degrees in Visual Art and Computer Science from Brown University, she has long been interested in 3D. In college, she wrote a ray tracer and created holographic stereograms with 3D graphics just for fun.
Kimberly Kowal Arcand
Kimberly Kowal Arcand

Visualization Lead, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Chandra X-ray Center
Kimberly Kowal Arcand directs visualizations and digital media for NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory at the Chandra X-ray Center (CXC) located at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass. She is responsible for imaging and astronomical visualization and research, digital storytelling, exhibition and product creation, as well as program evaluation. She directed the Chandra submission that won the Pirelli International award for science communication in Physics in 2007. She is a principle in the Aesthetics and Astronomy image response research project with international participation. She is principal investigator for the award-winning “From Earth to the Universe” astronomical exhibition project that occurred in 1,000 locations across 70 countries worldwide. Kim recently co-wrote the non-fiction book “Your Ticket to the Universe: A Guide To Exploring the Cosmos,” published by Smithsonian Books on April 2, 2013.
Claudine Brown
Claudine Brown

Assistant Secretary for Education and Access, Smithsonian Institution
Claudine K. Brown is the assistant secretary for education and access for the Smithsonian Institution. She is responsible for defining the Smithsonian’s education program and reports directly to Secretary Wayne Clough. Her focus is the Institution-wide plan for educational initiatives, assessment strategies and funding for students in the K-12 range. Brown oversees two of the Smithsonian’s educational organizations—the National Science Resources Center and the Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies—and coordinates 32 education-based offices in museums and science centers.
G. Wayne Clough
G. Wayne Clough

Secretary, Smithsonian Institution
Wayne Clough is the 12th Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. Clough has launched a new era at the Institution, expanding the Smithsonian's global relevance and helping the nation shape its future through research, education and scientific discovery on major topics of the day.
Diego Mayer-Cantú
Diego Mayer-Cantú

Presidential Innovation Fellow, Smithsonian Institution
Presidential Innovation Fellow Diego Mayer-Cantú is working at the Smithsonian as part of a fellowship established by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy in 2012 to pair innovators from the private sector with government innovators. The Smithsonian is one of several agencies sponsoring fellows in support of the Obama administration’s Open Data initiatives. At the Smithsonian, he has been working closely with the Digitization Program Office to identify new processes and technologies to speed up 2D and 3D digitization efforts. Also, Mayer-Cantú is the founder and CEO of Inventively, a company democratizing the process of obtaining intellectual property.
Paul Debevec
Paul Debevec

Associate Director for Graphics Research, University of Southern California Institute for Creative Technologies & Research Professor
Paul Debevec is a research professor at the University of Southern California and the associate director of graphics research at USC's Institute for Creative Technologies.

At USC ICT, Debevec has led the development of a series of Light Stage devices for capturing and simulating how objects and people reflect light, used to create photoreal digital actors in films such as Spider Man 2, Superman Returns, and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, and Avatar.
Tatjana Dzambazova
Tatjana Dzambazova

Technology Whisperer and Sr. Product Manager, Reality Capture, Autodesk
Tatjana Dzambazova is trained architect with 12 years of experience in architecture and design in Vienna and London. Always fascinated by the impact that technology has on our lives, she decided to continue her career in the digital design technology world, where, working for Autodesk for the last 12 years , she has been passionately whispering and teaching technology, authoring books and leading product development of exciting new digital design tools.

An avid believer that we are all born with a sense for creativity and innovation and the need to express it, Tanja focuses her energy on helping make and promote powerful digital design technologies in a way that is accessible to wide range of new audiences. In the past two years, Tatjana was focusing her efforts in leading development of cutting edge tools in the area of Reality Capture, democratizing novel approaches in domains such as digital conservation and preservation of cultural heritage, arts and natural sciences etc.
René W.R.J. Dekker
René W.R.J. Dekker

Director of Collections, Naturalis Biodiversity Center
René W.R.J. Dekker is Director of Collections of Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, the Netherlands, since 2005. From 1991 - 2005 he was curator of birds in the National Museum of Natural History, Naturalis. Naturalis Biodiversity Center is a recent merger of four institutes with a long history in natural history and biodiversity studies: the national herbarium of the Netherlands (Leiden en Wageningen University branches), the Zoological Museum of the University of Amsterdam and the National Museum of Natural History Naturalis, Leiden. Both staff (200 FTE) and collections (37 million objects) have merged into one of the largest natural history collections in the world. Through a grant by the Dutch government, Naturalis was given the opportunity and challenge to digitize and register at least 7 million objects in 5 years. This has lead to innovative, almost industrial ways to digitize plants, vertebrates and invertebrates, fossils, wet collections, glass slides and archives. René has been in charge of the transfer of 22 million objects from whales and elephants to fleas, flies and plants to Leiden and their integration and digitization.
Ping Fu
Ping Fu

VP & Chief Strategy Officer, 3D Systems
Honored in 2005 by Inc. Magazine as “The Entrepreneur of the Year”, Ping Fu describes herself as an artist and scientist who practice her expression in business. In 1997, Ping co-founded Geomagic, a 3D imaging software company, which was acquired by 3D Systems in February 2013. Before co-founding Geomagic, Ping was involved in the NCSA Mosaic software that led to Netscape and Internet Explorer. Ping serves on the National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship at the Department of Commerce and on the board of directors at the Long Now Foundation. Ping’s book Bend, Not Break was published by Portfolio Penguin Jan 2013.
Saul Griffith
Saul Griffith

CEO, Otherlab
Saul Griffith has multiple degrees in materials science and mechanical engineering and completed his PhD in Programmable Assembly and Self Replicating machines at MIT. He is the co-founder of numerous companies including: Low Cost Eyeglasses, Squid Labs, Potenco, Instructables.com, HowToons and Makani Power. Saul has been awarded numerous awards for invention including the National Inventors Hall of Fame, Collegiate Inventor's award, and the Lemelson-MIT Student prize. Saul co-authors children's comic books called “HowToons” about building your own science and engineering gadgets with Nick Dragotta and Joost Bonsen. Saul is a technical advisor to Make magazine and Popular Mechanics. Saul is a columnist and contributor to Make and Craft magazines.
Carmen Iannacone
Carmen Iannacone

Chief Technology Officer, Smithsonian Institution
As CTO, Carmen is responsible for evaluating and implementing new technologies for use in the Smithsonian IT infrastructure, optimizing performance of its IT operations, establishing standards and guiding lifecycle development. The Institution’s nineteen museums and research stations provide a diverse technology climate, and his role is an integral liaison between centralized IT and the public. Prior to joining the Smithsonian, Mr. Iannacone served as director of worldwide IT operations for the Federal Acquisition Service of the General Services Administration (GSA), and was partner a software development consultancy in Alexandria, VA. He holds several patents for software and lives in Sterling, VA.
Peter Jakab
Peter Jakab

Associate Director and Chief Curator, National Air & Space Museum
Dr. Peter L. Jakab is chief curator of the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. Formerly he served as the Museum’s associate director for Collections and Curatorial Affairs. He has been with the Museum since 1983. He holds a BA, MA, and PhD in American history from Rutgers University. Areas of specialization include the history of technology, aerospace history, and American social and cultural history. Prior museum work includes stays at the Edison National Historic Site, West Orange, N.J., and the New Jersey Historical Commission. He also spent a year with the Thomas A. Edison Papers Project and two years teaching American history at Rutgers University during his graduate study. During his stay at the Museum, he has curated numerous exhibitions and frequently lectured on the history of technology; the history of invention; the Wright brothers and pioneer aviation; and First World War aviation.
Kirk Johnson
Kirk Johnson

Director, National Museum of Natural History
Kirk Johnson is the Sant Director of the National Museum of Natural History. He oversees more than 460 employees, an annual federal budget of $68 million (museum’s federal budget in FY 2012) and a collection of more than 126 million specimens and artifacts—the largest collection at the Smithsonian. The Museum of Natural History hosts an average of 7 million visitors a year, and its scientists publish about 500 scientific research contributions a year.
Jennifer L. Jones
Jennifer L. Jones

Chair, Armed Forces History and Numismatics, National Museum of American History
As the curator and chair of the Armed Forces History Division and the National Numismatic Collection, Jennifer Jones oversees the Museum’s extensive military history collections, and more than 1.5 million numismatic objects. This armed forces collection has been highlighted in many of the exhibitions Jones has curated during her almost 30 years at the Museum.

One of Jones current exhibitions, Price of Freedom: Americans at War, provides a broad overview of American military history from the American Revolution to the current day conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. She recently curated the updated exhibit surrounding the Gunboat Philadelphia, reinstalling and updating the exhibit.

Jones’ past projects include some of the Museum’s most popular exhibitions including: A More Perfect Union: Japanese Americans and the U.S. Constitution, Fast Attacks and Boomers: Submarines in the Cold War; World War II: Sharing Memories ; and Personal Legacy: The Healing of a Nation which was the first ever exhibition of the objects left at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Research Specialties
  • 20th century U.S. military history
  • Japanese Americans and World War II
  • Vietnam War and Vietnam Veterans Memorial
Corey Kilbane
Corey Kilbane

Chemistry Teacher and Science Innovation Coach, William Penn Charter School
A graduate of Washington University, with a Masters in Chemistry from the University of Chicago, Corey taught chemistry at St John’s College High School and then spent last year in his hometown of Wichita, working in technology in a Middle School. This gave him the chance to reflect on his own practice and he has integrated technology into teaching chemistry in a thoughtful and impressive way.
Pherabe Kolb
Pherabe Kolb

Associate Director of Strategic Communications, Smithsonian Institution
Pherabe Kolb is the Associate Director of Strategic Communications at the Smithsonian, where she oversees the Institution’s brand strategy and internal communications. She managed the creation and execution of the Institution’s first-ever national advertising campaign – Smithsonian Seriously Amazing – that launched in October 2012.

In February 2013, Ms. Kolb was appointed to serve as Project Director of the Smithsonian Innovation Space at the Arts & Industries Building, a planned interim use of this historic landmark that has been closed to the public since 2004. Through educational activities, events and changing virtual displays, the Smithsonian Innovation Space will invite audiences to experience the Smithsonian through the lens of Innovation — what drives it, who makes it possible, how it happens, what it creates, and how innovations have shaped America and changed our world.
Herbert Maschner
Herbert Maschner

Director, Idaho Museum of Natural History and Professor of Anthropology, Idaho State University
Herbert Maschner is Director of the Idaho Museum of Natural History and Professor of Anthropology at Idaho State University. Author of 116 articles, books, and chapters, he is a specialist in the archaeology, biocomplexity, and natural history of Western North America, Alaska and the Arctic. For the last seven years he has led a number of projects which use 3D technologies to democratize science and education by making complete natural history repositories available online. His research on scientific virtualization of collections has been featured in Museum and the Journal of Archaeological Science.
Brian Mathews
Brian Mathews

Vice President and Group CTO, Reality Capture, Autodesk
As Autodesk VP Reality Capture, Brian Mathews heads the Autodesk Reality Capture team enabling designers, engineers, and digital artists to incorporate the physical world into digital models and simulations. Reality capture involves 3D laser scanning, augmented reality, photogrammetry, computer vision, reverse engineering, and other sensor techniques. Previously, he was VP of Autodesk Labs, a showcase of innovative design technology.
Adam Metallo
Adam Metallo

3D Program Officer, Smithsonian Institution
Adam Metallo received his BS in Psychology from the University of Maryland in 2004 and MFA in painting from the University of Delaware in 2006. Working at the Smithsonian Office of Exhibits Central he developed workflows that integrate 3D technologies with traditional museum model making. In 2010 he began spending most of his time quietly sneaking up on inanimate objects to digitize them in 3D for the Smithsonian Digitization Program Office.
Scott Miller
Scott Miller

Deputy Under Secretary for Collections and Interdisciplinary Support
Scott Miller is Deputy Under Secretary for Collections and Interdisciplinary Support, responsible for central planning and development of the Smithsonian’s vast collections (137 million objects) and interdisciplinary support operations, including collections management, conservation and preservation, and related functions. He oversees the National Collections Program, Office of Fellowships and Internships, Office of International Relations, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Smithsonian Institution Libraries and Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press. Also, Miller is a liaison between the Smithsonian and various cultural and scientific organizations in the United States and around the world.
Rolf Müller
Rolf Müller

Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech & Taishan Professor Shandong University - Virginia Tech International Laboratory
Rolf Müller's research interests have been the biophysics of biosonar sensing in bats and its engineering applications (bio-inspired technology). To study bats/biosonar from a physics and engineering perspective, he has divided his time between the United States and China in recent years. He joined the School of Physics at Shandong University (SDU) as a full professor in 2005 and received an endowed Taishan Professorship since 2009. He became an associate professor with the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Tech (VT) in 2008 and he also has adjunct appointments with VT's Department of Physics and the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. Since 2010, he has been the director of the SDU–VT International Laboratory located on Shangdong University central campus in Jinan, investigating the biophysics of the most sophisticated biosonar systems that can be found in Chinese bats. Since 2011, he directs a partner laboratory- the Global Laboratory for Bioinspired Engineering Science (GLOBES) in the Institute for Critical and Applied Science (ICTAS) on Virginia Tech's main campus in Blacksburg.
Liz Neely
Liz Neely

Director of Digital Information and Access, Art Institute of Chicago
Elizabeth Neely is the Director of Digital Information and Access at the Art Institute of Chicago. Working with museum departments and leading technical developer teams, many of her efforts center on planning and developing innovative means to deliver exhibition and collection information to the museum’s varied audiences.

She has worked at the Art Institute of Chicago for almost 14 years. In 2008, she received her MBA from Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management with concentrations in Marketing, Technology and Non-Profit Management.
Nicholas D. Pyenson
Nicholas D. Pyenson

Research Geologist, Curator of Fossil Marine Mammals, National Museum of Natural History
Nick is curator of fossil marine mammals at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, in Washington, D.C. Previously, he was a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of British Columbia; he received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He completed his B.S. from Emory University, and his A.A. from Oxford College of Emory University. Nick's research interests also include the macroecology, taphonomy, and functional morphology of marine tetrapods. Nick grew up in both Quebec and Louisiana, which naturally leads to long discourses about the virtues of Stanley Cup parades and crawfish boils.
Douglas Pritchard
Douglas Pritchard

Senior Lecturer at Heriot Watt University in Edinburgh and an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Glasgow, Scotland
Doug’s primary area of research is in immersive visualization and advanced 3D documentation technology in relation to architecture, heritage and urban design. As the former Director of the CDDV, Douglas was actively involved in the innovative Scottish Ten project - the precision documentation of the 5 Scottish World Heritage sites and 5 international sites. His work with Historic Scotland has been featured in The New York Times, The Guardian, The Toronto Star, Discovery Channel, BBC and National Geographic.
Julian Raby
Julian Raby

Director, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Julian Raby was appointed director of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in March 2002. A well-known scholar of Islamic art, Raby has a wide range of scholarly interests, from Byzantium to China, Late Antiquity to the Renaissance. Raby also has extensive experience in the field of publishing, where he has distinguished himself in the area of Asian studies as an author, editor and publisher. At Oxford, he was the series founder and series editor of Oxford Studies in Islamic Art. He is the founder and former co-owner of Azimuth Editions, a major publisher in the field of Asian studies. Raby is the author of numerous papers, articles and books in the field of Islamic art, including “Venice, Dürer and the Oriental Mode” (1982); “Iznik: The Pottery of Ottoman Turkey” (London, 1989), “Turkish Bookbinding in the 15th Century, The Foundation of a Court Style” (1993) and “Qajar Portraits” (London, 1999). Raby was born in London. He received his bachelor’s degree with honors from Magdalen College at the University of Oxford (1971), where he also earned his doctorate in Oriental Studies (1981). His affiliation with Oxford grew to include a prominent role as university lecturer in Islamic art and architecture (1979 to present), chairman of curators of the Oriental Institute (1991-1993 and 1995-2000) and chairman of the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies (1993-1995).
Michael Raphael
Michael Raphael

CEO, Direct Dimensions
Michael earned a BS degree in Engineering Science and Mechanics from Virginia Tech, followed by a Masters of Engineering Administration from George Washington University. During his 10 years at Lockheed Martin as an engineer responsible for solving aerostructures manufacturing quality problems, Michael co-developed the FaroArm portable CMM and became the first user on the planet! In 1995, he founded Direct Dimensions, Inc., now in its 15th year of providing rapid solutions to 3D problems.
Benjamin Rennison
Benjamin Rennison

Archaeologist and 3D Metrologist, Warren Lasch Conservation Center, Clemson University
Benjamin Rennison specializes in three-dimensional archaeological reconstruction and documentation. He obtained a degree in Boat Design and Production from the University of Plymouth in 2004, and continued on to complete his post graduate studies at the University of Bristol to obtain a Masters in Maritime Archaeology in 2007. During his studies his research concentrated on material cultural patterning theory and the application of modern techniques in traditional boat building.

Before working in the sphere of archaeology Benjamin worked in the field of industrial design and production, specializing in the CAD design and modification of military helicopters. It was during this period that Benjamin developed an interest in computer aided design and its applicability in the recording of structures both on the surface of the water and below.
Vincent Rossi
Vincent Rossi

3D Program Officer, Smithsonian Institution
Vincent Rossi hails from the great state of New Jersey. He has a BFA in sculpture from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and Graduate level fine art study at Goldsmiths College/ University of London, England. From 2004 to 2011, he worked as a sculptor, model maker and project manager for the Smithsonian's Office of Exhibit Central and helped produce and manage many Smithsonian exhibits. From 2011 to present Vince works as a 3D Program Officer for the Smithsonian's Digitization Program Office - building 3D capacity, developing 3D workflows and trying to live life to the fullest.
Kevin Scofield
Kevin Scofield

Senior Product Manager, 3D Systems
Kevin Scofield is a Senior Product Manager at 3D Systems and has spent the last 13 years helping to develop unique software solutions for creating and working with 3D scan data as part of Geomagic, Inc (acquired by 3D Systems in 2013). In working with scan data both large (Saturn V rocket engines) and small (dragonflies), Kevin understands the challenges involved in converting the physical world into digital models. His expertise is in understanding the relationship between what is being scanned and the scanning device used, and how to make relevant, useful and exciting results appear both on screen and in printed form. Kevin's background is aerospace engineering, and worked at Northrop Grumman for four years prior to joining Geomagic (now 3D Systems) in 2000.
Günter Waibel
Günter Waibel

Director, Digitization Program Office, Smithsonian Institution
Günter Waibel was born in a sizable meteorite crater in the Bavarian countryside (but that is a story for a different time.) Günter joined the Smithsonian Institution in December 2010 as Director of the Digitization Program Office, where he oversees policy and strategy for digitizing and managing Smithsonian assets, and the implementation of the strategic plan “Creating a Digital Smithsonian.” A particular focus of the Digitization Program Office is to scale up throughput of digitization at the Smithsonian, as well as the implementation of cutting-edge gigapixel and 3D capture technologies. Günter is a past board member of the Museum Computer Network (MCN) (2003-2009) and the Association of American Museum’s (AAM) Media & Technology Committee (2004-2007). He has taught as adjunct faculty in the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University, New York (2004-2008), and the School of Library and Information Science at Catholic University of America, Washington DC (2010). He has an MA in English Literature from Georgetown University.
Keith Wilson
Keith Wilson

Curator of Ancient Chinese Art, Freer Gallery of Art & Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Keith Wilson completed his PhD coursework at Princeton University after receiving his MAs in Chinese art and archaeology from both the University of Michigan and Princeton University. After serving as a Mellon Fellow at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, he was appointed curator at the Cleveland Museum of Art and, later, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. In 2006, Keith joined the curatorial staff at the Freer and Sackler. Although his primary field of expertise continues to be Chinese antiquities, he has researched and published broadly on a range of East Asian art historical topics, including Korean and Japanese art. He is currently planning the reinstallation of the Chinese exhibits in the Freer and Sackler, in addition to a major exhibition dedicated to art produced in the late Shang dynasty capital, Anyang.